Pennsylvania officials have decided not to allow medical marijuana patients access to edibles for now due to concerns about safety, efficacy, and legal enforcement.

Jeremy Bouvet
Pennsylvania officials have decided not to allow medical marijuana patients access to edibles for now due to concerns about safety, efficacy, and legal enforcement.

Pennsylvania officials have decided not to allow medical marijuana patients access to edibles for now due to concerns about safety, efficacy, and legal enforcement.

The vote came after a discussion about the growing popularity of “troches,” an ingestible form of THC that resembles a cough drop. The Medical Marijuana Advisory Board halted voting on the proposal, with only two members supporting it and two rejecting it. Edibles, an ingestible form of THC, are popular among patients who dislike the respiratory and digestive side effects of other forms of medical marijuana. Critics argue that traditional edibles in other states come with a higher risk of poisoning, particularly in children, due to deceptive packaging and underestimated potency. If approved, the board's recommendations will head to the legislature for consideration. Pending bills in the Senate would bring edibles to the market with added regulations on testing and packaging, eliminate the state's list of qualifying conditions, no longer require renewal of access cards, and allow growers and processors to sell directly to patients. I mean, they could just do things like Canada and not allow colorful and alluring packaging, but what do I know?

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