CANNABIS AND TOBACCO COMBO UPS ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION RISK

CCJ Gabriel
CANNABIS AND TOBACCO COMBO UPS ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION RISK
A study by the University of California, San Francisco, has found a link between the co-use of tobacco and cannabis and increased rates of anxiety and depression among US adults between 2020 and 2022. The study, which analyzed data from the COVID-19 Citizens Health Study, found that co-users of both substances exhibited a 1.8 times greater likelihood of experiencing these mental health challenges than non-users. The study also found that those who used neither tobacco nor cannabis reported anxiety and depression at rates of 10.6% and 11.2%, respectively. The study analyzed data from 53,843 US adults aged 18 and above, categorizing past 30-day use into four patterns: tobacco-only use, cannabis-only use, co-use of both substances, and non-use. The highest proportions of anxiety and depression were reported in the co-use group, followed by cannabis-only use and tobacco-only use. Daily use of cigarettes, e-cigarettes, and cannabis was associated with higher adjusted odds for anxiety and depression. The study suggests that integrating mental health support with tobacco and cannabis cessation may help address this co-morbidity.
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